Water Reclamation

About Us

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Mission/Vision:

A clean environment, affordably enjoyed by all, now and for the future.

Contact Information:

Jason Tincu, Plant Manager
2800 Guthrie Road
Dayton, OH 45417
Phone: (937) 333-1501
Fax: (937) 333-1826

Hours of Operation:

7:00 AM-3:30 PM, Monday - Friday
Closed Saturday, Sunday, and Holidays

Industrial Pretreatment Contact Information and Hours of Operation:

The offices of the Industrial Pretreatment Program are located at the City's Water Reclamation Plant at 2800 Guthrie Road in Dayton, Ohio. Program staff can be reached at (937) 333-1501 during regular office hours (Monday through Friday, from 7:30 a.m. through 5:00 p.m.). In the event of an after-hours emergency, contact the Department of Water 24-hour Emergency telephone number (937) 333-4900.

Click on the link to our Dayton Wastewater video to get a quick overview of the processes involved in reclaiming the 55 million gallons of wastewater that enter our plant every day.

Our Treatment Process

The City of Dayton, Division of Water Reclamation prevents and controls sanitary water pollution to the Great Miami River, working around the clock, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, year after year since 1929. The Division of Water Reclamation serves the City of Dayton and the region, including a large part of Montgomery County which includes Trotwood, Northridge, Riverside, Harrison Township, parts of Randolph Township, Oakwood, Kettering, Greene County, Moraine, and Wright Patterson Air Force Base. The staff of 71 full time employees serves 340,000 people, businesses, and industries by providing for disposal and treatment of all their collective wastewater discharges. The wastewater is treated to remove pollutants to a high degree of purity that meets or exceeds Ohio EPA issued permit requirements before it is discharged to the Great Miami River.

The WWTP is located at its original 1929 site in the southwest corner of the City of Dayton at river mile 76.1 on the 170.3 miles long Great Miami River. The average daily discharge ranges between 48 to 55 MGD. At this point on the river, the wastewater discharged from the WWTP can contribute up to 40 to 50% of the total river flow during low flow (drought) conditions. This large contribution to river flow requires the wastewater discharged to meet the cleanest water quality standards to protect warm water aquatic animals and plants, as well as, to allow for other designated uses like fishing, boating and skiing.

This need for very clean discharges required the City of Dayton to build major upgrades to its secondary treatment facilities. From 1983 to 1991 near continuous construction upgraded the treatment capacity and capabilities of the treatment plant to a 72,000,000 gallon per day Advanced Water Reclamation Facility. The treatment processes now provide preliminary, primary, secondary, advanced secondary (nitrification), filtration, chlorination/dechlorination and post-aeration to all wastewater.

Sludges collected and removed are stabilized through anaerobic digestion into biosolids, dewatered and used as fertilizer in a land application program on approved farms. The biosolids dewatering and land application program is performed by a private contractor. The average biosolids production is 40 to 45 dry tons per day.

Methane gas, produced as a by-product of anaerobic digestion, is used as a fuel for cogeneration engines. The cogeneration engines provide nearly 1/3 of the plant's electrical power needs. 100% of the plant heating requirements are supplied by the combination of cogeneration engine heat recovery and digester gas fired boilers.

Odors are a common but unwelcome side-effect of wastewater treatment. A new odor control facility consisting of a packed tower scrubber was installed in 1993 to address odor complaints from neighbors of the WWTP. This new facility replaced a smaller mist scrubber facility and increased air handling capacity 10 times. Odors are controlled through the containment of odors at the weir overflow areas of primary settling basins and subsequent evacuation and treatment with bleach and caustic in the packed tower scrubber. Collection system odors are also controlled by the addition of hydrogen peroxide at the Longworth and Westwood Pump Stations.

The Water Reclamation plant receives a significant portion of its wastewater flow and pollutants from industry. Control of the industrial pollutants and recovery of costs associated with their treatment is critical to the operation of the treatment plant. The Division of Water Reclamation administers an Industrial Pretreatment Program to protect the plant from industrial wastewater discharges which contain pollutants that may upset treatment, pass-through the plant and contaminate the Great Miami River, or accumulate in the biosolids and limit its use as farm fertilizer. Industries discharging metals and/or toxic organic pollutants are required to pretreat their wastewater to remove excessive amounts of these pollutants to assure no adverse impact on the City of Dayton Water Reclamation Plant. Control of the pollutants requires extensive monitoring of individual industries through sampling and chemical analyses. Discharges from industries exceeding predetermined standards are controlled through enforcement actions which includes fees and surcharges for extra-strength wastewater.

Operation of the Water Reclamation Plant requires the services of many different personnel. The Division is composed of the following bureaus:

  • Operations

    Thirty-five full-time wastewater operators work 3 shifts per day, 7 days a week to insure that the treatment process operates at peak efficiency. They control the flows and removal processes, record operating data, open and close valves and do whatever it takes to keep the system running smoothly.
  • Maintenance

    Twenty-one full-time maintenance employees are responsible for keeping all of the mechanical and electrical equipment in service.
  • Industrial Pretreatment

    Two pretreatment coordinators and a four-member industrial monitoring group make sure that industrial sewer customers are meeting the limits of their discharge permits and paying fees proportionate to the wastewater treatment services they receive.
  • Laboratory

    A team of five bacteriologist/chemists serve as the ‘eyes and ears’ of the organization. They perform laboratory testing to insure NPDES permit compliance, provide operational data to the operators, and monitor industrial discharge customers for permit compliance and sewer use surcharges.
  • Administration

    The administrative group does the paper-pushing required to monitor expenses, purchase equipment and supplies, manage the payroll, administer contracts, provide and document training and maintain all of the programs necessary to keep the plant operational.

Physical Treatment:

When wastewater enters the plant, it is screened to remove large objects from the wastewater stream, after which the ‘grit’, or small abrasive particles, are settled out. Following grit removal, the wastewater is directed to large settling basins, or ‘clarifiers’ in which oil and grease floats to the top and is skimmed off. The heavy sludge component settles to the bottom of the basin and is pumped to the anaerobic digesters, where biological treatment is applied.

Biological Treatment:

The next phase of treatment is biological in nature, where microorganisms are maintained under optimal conditions that allow them to use the waste material dissolved in the wastewater as food and break the complex wastewater molecules into more elemental particles, thus cleaning the water. Microorganisms attached to the rock media in the 20 trickling filters reduce the strength of the wastewater, measured by the ‘Biochemical Oxygen Demand’ test in the laboratory. Further biological treatment and ammonia removal is carried out in the aeration basins, where oxygen is supplied to microorganisms living in the ‘activated sludge’ maintained in the basins. Again, the wastewater serves as food for the ‘bugs’, which digest the waste portion of the wastewater, living cleaner water behind. Each biological process is followed by another physical treatment process, producing cleaner wastewater in each step.

Chemical Treatment:

Throughout the process, many chemicals are used to help purify the water. The chlorine in sodium hypochlorite destroys pathogenic bacteria in the wastewater that would make people sick, hydrogen peroxide is used to oxidize waste particles and remove foul-smelling sulfides from the water. Ferrous chloride prevents hydrogen sulfide from becoming an atmospheric threat in the digesters. Sodium hydroxide and sodium hypochlorite work together to remove odorous compounds from the wastewater. Sodium bisulfite, in turn, removes residual chlorine that would otherwise poison the wastewater effluent receiving stream, which is the Great Miami River.

Maintenance:

Twenty-one full-time maintenance employees are responsible for keeping all of the mechanical and electrical equipment in service.

Laboratory Services:

A team of five bacteriologist/chemists serve as the ‘eyes and ears’ of the organization. They perform laboratory testing to insure NPDES permit compliance, provide operational data to the operators, and monitor industrial discharge customers for permit compliance and sewer use surcharges.

Pretreatment:

Two pretreatment coordinators and a four-member industrial monitoring group make sure that industrial sewer customers are meeting the limits of their discharge permits and paying fees proportionate to the wastewater treatment services they receive.

Administration:

The administrative group does the paper-pushing required to monitor expenses, purchase equipment and supplies, manage the payroll, administer contracts, provide and document training and maintain all of the programs necessary to keep the plant operational.

Page last modified: 2014/11/04.  Documents contained on this page may have been modified at a different time.